I’ve changed my ‘about’ page . . . .

This blog is is something I had wanted to do for a while.  Back then it seemed to me as well as some of my friends and colleagues, that when it comes to wild life issues, the perspective comes from either the ‘hook and bullet’ crowd, or the extreme environmentalist. That still holds true, although I think extreme environmentalism is getting stronger and more ‘mainstream’ every day.

I had hoped to straddle that divide, but don’t think I have, or can. Neither of the two extremes seem to make sense to me. Originally, I had hoped I would be posting ‘guest’ blogs from time to time, but that hasn’t happened, so I might as well just forget about it.

As for me, I’m still the same person I was wwas, just a couple of years older . . .

I am retired from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, now called the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (I guess trees are not a natural resource). I’m a Biologist with an MSc, and was a Biologist for the Ministry. I worked on many projects including helping to write the guidelines used to maintain ecological integrity to forest ecosystems when areas are planned for harvest, renewal and maintenance. I was also integral to re-introducing elk back to Ontario.

In addition to my former ‘day job’, I’ve been writing on outdoor subject matter for magazines and newspapers for over 40 years. I’m a columnist for Ontario Out of Doors magazine.

Interestingly (at least to me) the magazine once asked me to blog, but then declined to go with it because some of my personal views don’t sit well with their owner and publisher. So be assured this blog is a true reflection of what I think, not what I’m paid to write. And I don’t get paid a cent for this blog.

If you have anything you’d like to see this blog address – given what little I’ve provided – let me know, and I’ll see what I can do.

By the way, unless it says otherwise, all the photos that appear on these posts were taken by me, unless they include me (I seldom do selfies). They are embedded with my copyright, so shouldn’t be copied and used without my permission. Although they are in low-res in the posts, most were taken as a NEF (RAW) image, so are available in high resolution in whatever format you might want (e.g., jpg, TIFF).

Thanks!

5 comments
  1. Sam Menard said:

    Hey Bruce, What do you know about porcupines? I moved to Nipigon in 1990 and noticed an abundance of porkys all over the place. Now, I can’t remember the last time that I’ve seen one. Although fishers are around, I wouldn’t say that they are very common. Could a disease be responsible for their disappearance?

    Sam

    • I don’t know a whole lot about porcupines, although I do like them, unlike many. My wife raised one (and released it later) after its mother had been shot by a cottager. A few years ago, a friend of mine shot a dozen or so when they insisted on chewing on his hunt camp – after that, he has seldom seen one. I do know they have a slow rate of reproduction (only one young per year). And as you note, fishers do eat them. They are also quite secretive in that they will spend a long period of time, at least in winter, close to their den. We’ve been keeping tabs on one this winter and it hasn’t strayed, as far as we can tell, more than 20 m from it’s den (eats in a jack pine, then goes back to its hideaway). I mention this as it suggests to me they could be more numerous than we think if that’s how they behave (at least when the snow is deep). My wife (a licensed wildlife rehabilitator) thinks porcupines MIGHT be susceptible to tularemia, but isn’t positive. Other than that, we don’t know of any diseases that might be doing in the porcupine population.

      On Tue, Mar 17, 2015 at 5:58 PM, wildlifeperspectives wrote:

      >

  2. I clicked the like button but it was not a 100% like. I would appreciate if you had a name and some indication of where you lived. I assume southern Ontario but it could be down town Thunder Bay or even Toronto. How about Minaki or Hornepayne?

  3. Very good. Thank you Bruce. I lived in Kenora from 1964 to 1973 and know the area well. I look forward to reading the rest of your blog.

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