Crossed

fox-1

On the way home from a fishing trip the other day (one splake), Lil and I spied a cross fox in a field beside the road. The fox was quite cooperative, and let me stop the truck, get my camera out of the bag and take several shots. It looked like it was intent on a mouse, or more likely, a vole, but no luck (although good luck for the vole). Eventually, the fox wandered off.

A cross fox is simply a colour phase of the red fox. Across the range of the red fox different colour phases are often seen, but in this area, the common and classic bright orange red fox is actually quite rare. Most of the foxes here are crosses. They are called cross foxes because they have a blackish cross on their back, across their shoulders.

We also have a fair number of black foxes around. They aren’t completely black, as they still have the white tip on the tail, and much of the fur is silver-tipped, similar to the black fur on this cross fox.

There were a number of fox farms in this region in the middle of the last century, which I’ve been told accounts for the colour phases that continue to be prominent if not dominant in the local population. Ranch furs were selectively bred to provide colour variety, but there were escapes and I suspect that when the fur farms started to go out of business, many foxes were simply released and their genes continue to persist.

Today, wild fox are trapped across much of their range, but their fur value in this area is rather low (particularly the cross-foxes, as colours are hard to match as they vary quite a bit in the amounts of red and black fur they sport). In addition, fox are much harder to trap then more valuable furs like marten, mink and fisher, are not the easiest animal to skin and often have mange, which further reduces the value of their pelt.

Fox can also be hunted on a small game license, but hunting effort here is minimal.

Fox are great mousers (which includes voles) but will also take grouse and hare and other small birds and animals. They also do a fair amount of scavenging on wolf kill, whom they sometimes follow; at a safe distance, of course.

Bottom line – foxes are common in this area, as they are in most places. Even though, sightings are usually fleeting, and so I’m pleased this one decided to buck the trend and let me capture his image.

 

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3 comments
  1. Reblogged this on Stella the Great Newfenees and commented:
    One of Elizabeth’s local blogging friends wrote this about one of our furry neighbours. Foxes are big teases, and they hang out on the Campbell Estate. All Elizabeth ever sees with me around, though, is their footprints in the snow!

  2. mariodacat said:

    What a beautiful animal. I have only seen red foxes around here, so this is new information to me. What a handsome animal.

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